Skip To Content

Resident Update

Discover the latest updates from our community as we feature insights from both team members and residents. Stay informed with our Resident Update
April 24 @ 10:00 am

BGU: When Religions Got Morals WEEK 4

Click "Register for Week _" to be registered for the classes you wish to attend.

All classes will take place on Wednesdays, April 3- April 24 at 3:00pm - 4:00pm in Blackmer Hall

Early world religions didn't have much of an ethical component; the emphasis was more on making sacrifices to deities in hope of favors or to prevent divine displeasure.  And then came the "Axial Age," a period when, across Eurasia, some very diverse cultures decided that God/the gods cared about how human beings treated each other, with profound consequences for human societies.  For the four weeks of this class, we will examine four great world religions that developed from the Axial Age and how this new moral component continues to echo to the present day.
4/3 Week I: Asian Experiments.  The focus will be on how Buddhism grew from Hinduism, as Siddhartha Gautama (the Buddha) came to grips with the poverty and suffering of his society.  We will also look at the semi-religion of Confucianism for comparison. 4/ 10 Week II: Mediterranean Melting Pots: Judaism and Zoroastrianism learned much from each other, and by c. 500 BCE both were teaching that God cares how we treat our neighbors.  At about the same time, Greek philosophers began exploring the same issues, adding a moral component at least to elites among Greek polytheists. 4/17 Week III: Transforming the Roman World: How Christianity made a difference.  There's a lot to live up to when the founder of your religion allows himself to be killed for you.  In this week, we will examine how early Christian communities internalized the moral implications of their new religion, gradually reshaping Roman society in the process. 4/ 24 Week IV: The Prophet's Social Message.  Muhammad grew up on an Arabian Peninsula under massive social stress.  His teaching has two key, intermeshed components: submission to God's will, and care for your fellow humans.  Early Islam produced a social safety net that energized and transformed the Near and Middle East (and beyond). $25 a class or $100 for series
April 24 @ 3:00 pm

Visiting Guest Artist, Yifat Bezalel!

View Flyer Here
April 26 @ 2:00 pm

BGU: The History of Northern Renaissance Art WEEK 4

The History of Northern Renaissance Art (Monday, April 8th- April 29th at 11:00am in Blackmer Hall) This 4-week course will introduce students to the history of Northern Renaissance art. Students will learn about Flemish, Dutch, and German artists who worked between 1400-1600. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and techniques employed by these artists; visual comparisons will be made with contemporaneous Italian Renaissance art. Week 1: Divinity in Everyday Life : Robert Campin, Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden (Monday, April 8th, at 11:00am in Blackmer Hall) Week 2: The Body and Natural Materials: Martin Schongauer, Matthias Grünewald, Albrecht Dürer (Monday, April 15th, at 11:00am in Blackmer Hall) Week 3: Visualizations of the Fantastic: Lucas Cranach the Elder, Hans Baldung, Hieronymus Bosch (Monday, April 22nd, at 11:00am in Blackmer Hall) Week 4: Realism in Politics and Myth: Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Jan Gossaert, Hans Holbein the Younger (Monday, April 29th, at 11:00am in Blackmer Hall)
April 29 @ 11:00 am

Table Trivia

Come, join us and put your skills and knowledge to the test at our weekly table trivia event. It's a fun-filled evening that you wouldn't want to miss!
April 29 @ 4:30 pm

What’s True? How to Navigate the 2024 Election

What's True? Join Investigative Journalist Kim Cutter on How to Navigate the 2024 Election on May 1st at 3:00 pm in Blackmer Hall. Kimberly Cutter, daughter of BG residents Liz and Will Stewart, is a journalist, novelist, and creator and host of The Control Variable: American Propaganda. This investigative podcast series takes an unprecedented look into the history and science of propaganda to better understand the events of January 6, 2021. She is the former Executive Editor for Harper’s Bazaar and the former West Coast Editor for W Magazine. She is also the author of the critically acclaimed novel The Maid. Cutter has written for many publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Telegraph, Elle, Vanity Fair, New York, Marie Claire and Vogue.com. She lives in the Hudson Valley with her husband and various fur children. Here's a link to The Control Variable's website, with info and links about each of the episodes in the American Propaganda series: https://atomicwhalestudioscom   BIO Kimberly Cutter is a journalist, novelist, and creator and host of The Control Variable: American Propaganda, an investigative podcast series that takes an unprecedented look into the history and science of propaganda to better understand the events of January 6, 2021. She is the former Executive Editor for Harper’s Bazaar and the former West Coast Editor for W Magazine. She is also the author of the critically acclaimed novel The Maid. Cutter has written for many publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Telegraph, Elle, Vanity Fair, New York, Marie Claire and Vogue.com. She lives in the Hudson Valley with her husband and various fur children.      
May 1 @ 3:00 pm

BGU: Exploring Classical Music Through the Lens of Chamber Music with Sandra Nikolajev (WEEK 1)

Exploring Classical Music Through the Lens of Chamber Music with Sandra Nikolajevs, President and Artistic Director of Chamber Music Charleston Class 1 (Thursday, April 25): Setting the Stage For Chamber Music: From Bach to Mozart. It is commonly thought that the tradition of chamber music was first established in the late 1700s and early 1800s by such well-known composers as Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven…but we would not have been able to enjoy such an art form if it wasn’t for the music of the Baroque masters, such as Johann Sebastian Bach. This class will explore the origins of the Chamber Music medium. Class 2 (Thursday, May 2): From the Private Salons to the Concert Hall: The Evolution of Chamber Music between the Classical and Romantic Periods. Chamber Music was originally created as a way to enjoy classical music in the private homes or in the royal courts, among friends. As the caliber of performers increased – and the quality of the music began to equal that of great symphonies and operas – chamber music began to appear in the great concert halls. This class will show this transition with interesting anecdotes and descriptions of chamber music performances as it moved from a private to a more public art form. Class 3 (Thursday, May 9): Pushing the Limits of Music: Audience Reaction to Music of the 20th and 21st Century. The Classical Music world went through great change at the end of the Romantic Period, as it started to truly push the boundaries of tonality, rhythm, and structure. This change has continued to today, as we find ourselves in an era where there is so much diversity and styles to either enjoy…or run away from! This class will explore various performances with extreme audience reactions and provide a reflection on current chamber music concert offerings. Class 4 (Thursday, May 16): The Role of Classical Music and Chamber Music Today. What does historical context mean for the enjoyment of “Classical” chamber music today? We will entertain various ideas and learn from the perspective of a young musician who is just entering the professional world of music (cellist Peter O’Malley, who recently completed his first year of studies in Cello Performance at the Cleveland Institute of Music. He is also the son of the class lecturer, Sandra Nikolajevs) Each class is $25 whole series for $100
May 2 @ 11:00 am

Table Trivia

Come, join us and put your skills and knowledge to the test at our weekly table trivia event. It's a fun-filled evening that you wouldn't want to miss!
May 6 @ 4:30 pm

J Henry Fair: a Presentation of Climate Change Photography

Henry Fair is an American photographer, environmental activist, and co-founder of the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, New York.  Born in Charleston, Fair currently lives in New York City.  With his photos, Fair has called attention to environmental and political problems in different regions of the world. “Spring is coming with all that it means.  It's a time of reawakening and freshness and being outside.  But it is coming earlier, and that has meaning too.  Charleston and the low country will be uniquely impacted by the (climate) changes that are coming, and it will probably be sooner than we think.  How do we prepare, and what should we do?” These are the essential questions at the heart of Henry Fair's photography.  The South Carolina coast is his abiding love.
May 7 @ 3:00 pm

BGU: Exploring Classical Music Through the Lens of Chamber Music with Sandra Nikolajev (WEEK 2)

Exploring Classical Music Through the Lens of Chamber Music with Sandra Nikolajevs, President and Artistic Director of Chamber Music Charleston Class 1 (Thursday, April 25): Setting the Stage For Chamber Music: From Bach to Mozart. It is commonly thought that the tradition of chamber music was first established in the late 1700s and early 1800s by such well-known composers as Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven…but we would not have been able to enjoy such an art form if it wasn’t for the music of the Baroque masters, such as Johann Sebastian Bach. This class will explore the origins of the Chamber Music medium. Class 2 (Thursday, May 2): From the Private Salons to the Concert Hall: The Evolution of Chamber Music between the Classical and Romantic Periods. Chamber Music was originally created as a way to enjoy classical music in the private homes or in the royal courts, among friends. As the caliber of performers increased – and the quality of the music began to equal that of great symphonies and operas – chamber music began to appear in the great concert halls. This class will show this transition with interesting anecdotes and descriptions of chamber music performances as it moved from a private to a more public art form. Class 3 (Thursday, May 9): Pushing the Limits of Music: Audience Reaction to Music of the 20th and 21st Century. The Classical Music world went through great change at the end of the Romantic Period, as it started to truly push the boundaries of tonality, rhythm, and structure. This change has continued to today, as we find ourselves in an era where there is so much diversity and styles to either enjoy…or run away from! This class will explore various performances with extreme audience reactions and provide a reflection on current chamber music concert offerings. Class 4 (Thursday, May 16): The Role of Classical Music and Chamber Music Today. What does historical context mean for the enjoyment of “Classical” chamber music today? We will entertain various ideas and learn from the perspective of a young musician who is just entering the professional world of music (cellist Peter O’Malley, who recently completed his first year of studies in Cello Performance at the Cleveland Institute of Music. He is also the son of the class lecturer, Sandra Nikolajevs) Each class is $25 whole series for $100
May 9 @ 11:00 am